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Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Journal
20 most recent entries

Poster:tacheleis
Date:2008-07-08 14:45
Subject:letter to a lady
Security:Public

Hello,
i want to write a letter to Hanna Schygulla.
Does anybody know an adress? I would be thankful for some help.

Hallo
Ich würde gerne einen Brief an Hanna Schygulla schreiben. Vieleicht könnte mir mal jemand damit helfen..an welche Adresse könnte ich schreiben? Vielen Dank.

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Poster:gve
Date:2008-01-18 22:21
Subject:from russia with love
Security:Public

r_w_fasssbinder





Poster:handrejka
Date:2005-06-29 22:21
Subject:Obit for Brigitte Mira
Security:Public

I reported a few months ago that Brigitte Mira had died.
I've finally found a decent obit for her. Thought you might be interested

http://www.guardian.co.uk/obituaries/story/0,,1445557,00.html

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Poster:handrejka
Date:2005-03-13 13:32
Subject:Brigite Mira dies. Thought it might be of interest
Security:Public

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.obituaries/browse_frm/thread/aeef8773785cd6bf/d337cc3177f4acff?q=Brigitte+Mira#d337cc3177f4acff

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Poster:erdbeermund
Date:2004-11-09 05:36
Subject:Petra von Kant
Security:Public

As I recently mentioned in my journal, I hadn't seen Fassbinder's The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant since I was about 16.
I have just revisited it and discovered that my suspicions that I was just too young for it at the time were correct.
I actually like it pretty much, but now I am watching it with the commentary track and the film historian or whatever she calls herself is an idiot. She's like a third-rate film professor, someone who might be a TA at a community college.
It seems like she's talking out of her ass most of the time. She has many of her facts mixed up and it's annoying.
I wouldn't say this is his most accessible film, but I enjoy it as a Fassbinder fan.

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Poster:theunicursalhex
Date:2004-07-19 23:45
Subject:
Security:Public

We are please to annouce the birth of germancabaret. A fine bouncing baby girl or is it boy? Come join in our love of both the fiction and truth of the German Cabaret. I will be posting this to gothic and historical groups, hoping to get interest.

Danke!

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Poster:ombroludo
Date:2004-05-27 23:08
Subject:New member.
Security:Public
Mood: calm

My name's Ed. Yo.

So in my quest to take advantage of university resources as much as humanly possible for as long as I can until I graduate, I've been obsessively watching films. And, as you may have guessed, I'm starting to acquaint myself to the work of one Rainer Werner Fassbinder. My favourite that I've seen thus far (well, I've only really seen two) is Fox and His Friends. It reminded me a good bit of another of my favourites: Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria." Only more sinister. And well... with lots of hot gay cock.

Snicker snicker.
At any rate, good to be here!

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Poster:erdbeermund
Date:2004-04-21 21:15
Subject:Der amerikanische Freund
Security:Public

Today, I watched Fassbinder's ode to the American gangster film, The American Soldier (1970). I am starting to realise that my relationship to the work of Fassbinder is often of a love/hate variety. It holds my attention and is usually oddly compelling, but when it gets to the end, I am often unsure of what the point was. I agree with him about that quote about film makers making the same film over and over again. He always throws in all of this stuff about fucked up people being cruel to each other, whether it fits in the plot or not, and of course it is the exception when one of his protagonists survives the film intact. He also seems to rely heavily on what I might call the deus ex machina as primary screenwriting tool.
spoiler-laden discussionCollapse )

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Poster:erdbeermund
Date:2004-04-19 17:50
Subject:
Security:Public

I just finished watching In a Year with 13 Moons for the third time.
I am not sure exactly how I feel about it.
I guess I liked it well enough, possibly just because it is so weird.
I am realising that I much prefer his later "Hollywood" films.
So, I'd really like to see Lili Marleen. Too bad it's not available on video or DVD.

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Poster:erdbeermund
Date:2004-04-08 09:41
Subject:
Security:Public

I watched Veronika Voss yet again last night.
I think the use of music in that film is brilliant.
They repeatedly use three different German pastiches of country-western music to create a sense of madness or tension.
The pièce de résistance however is Veronika Voss's performance of "Memories Are Made of This" at her farewell party. Earlier in the film, we hear the original version on the omnipresent armed forces radio. It's an über-schmaltzy country-ish bit of kitsch. She transforms it into a wistful chanson du cabaret, which is really quite haunting.
And it's making me crazy, but I can't think of the theme from the score right now because someone is blasting the radio in the next room.

The two German pastiche songs I can think of though are this Hank Williams-esque "High on a Hilltop" and the more upbeat "Run Boy Run." Then the silently ubiquitous black American soldier sings this r&b-y song aboutlosing his soul.

't's all so very haunting.

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Poster:theunicursalhex
Date:2004-03-27 01:58
Subject:
Security:Public

I am a Fassbinder virgin and I am going to watch my first film of his I recorded off of the Sundance Channel. It is The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant.

I really like Lars Von Trier and he has been linked to Fassbinder for some reason, so maybe I will like his work too.

If not, you will probably not see me in these parts again.

Wish me luck on my deflowering!

Hex

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Poster:erdbeermund
Date:2004-03-07 08:24
Subject:Chinese Roulette
Security:Public

I just finished watching Fassbinder's Chinese Roulette. I always had a feeling about this one, despite that it seems to be one of his more obscure titles, and boy was I right! This one ranks up there with Veronika Voss, in my questionable opinion his best movie. This movie is dripping with style. The camera is constantly moving around the room and reframing and what we get is one stiking visual composition after another. The plot concerns a married couple who unwittingly, and as a result of their crippled teenaged daughter's machinations, end up at the country estate with their respective lovers. The housekeeper is too fabulous for words and her son is this dopey want-to-be philosopher with shockingly blond hair. The girl shows up with her mute governess. The final act is a sort of truth parlor game, for which the film is named, but in a way it seems that the film is told through it's staging and cinematography. The characters are constantly moving, I guess as their alliances shift, and forming compositions in the frame which often include mirrors or plexi-glass cabinets, dividing and reflecting. People are constantly observing other people through windows or ajar doors and there is this line about eavesdroppers often hearing false truths. The film is richly colored and the dialogue is sort of entrancing, kind of like in Last Year in Marienbad, but to a lesser degree. I think it's fascinating that there are a few plot elements that are never resolved, for instance we never find out the shadowy connection between the father and the housekeeper; there is this mention of someone dying in Paris and how there are only three of them left. It is possible that this film is total trash, but even if that's true, it's definitely my kind of trash. Then again, it shouldn't come as any surprise that I loved this move, given my obsession with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Boys in the Band, and really any film centered around cruel parlor games. These movies are for the most part well-written and I think they really get down to the quick of who we are as human beings in a difficult social environment.

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Poster:yourturntofall
Date:2003-12-30 02:04
Subject:
Security:Public

hello.

i'm new here
the name's chloe.
totally obsessed with fassbider (and movies in general).
does anyone post here?

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Poster:erdbeermund
Date:2003-10-29 02:21
Subject:
Security:Public

[crossposted to artfilm101. Does anyone read this community? I sense tumbleweeds blowing on through.]

Has anyone else seen Fassbinder's Veronika Voss?
It seems like it's one of his less popular works, but I totally loved it.
It's worth the price of admission alone for the scene where Veronika Voss sings "Memories Are Made of This."
I saw this movie once, several months ago, and I can't get it out of my head.
The atmosphere and the black and white cinematography are great. The actors are great, especially the woman who plays Veronika Voss.
It has this hard-boiled noir feel to it which I love and it is so subversive and demented.
The plot, if anyone hasn't seen it, concerns a news writer or something who meets a fading movie star, perhaps as part of a where-are-they-now? series. Then there is all this stuff about her doctor and I don't know what is too much to give away, but it's great, in my opinion.
I can't get it out of my head.

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Poster:thefuriouscynic
Date:2003-10-13 20:55
Subject:RWF Retrospective
Security:Public

For everyone in/around the Toronto area, Cinematheque Ontario is doing a RWF retrospective starting in mid-October. The programme also includes a bunch of 'Fassbinder favourites', so there's an opportunity to see new prints of some Sirk, Visconti, and Pasolini films... among others.

For anyone interested, or if you just want to check out the schedule, you can take a look at the programme here.

Unfortunately, Why Does Herr R. Run Amok? is missing from the retrospective!

And finally, a question. Has anyone been able to secure a copy of Lili Marleen, either on VHS (NTSC) or DVD (Region 1), subtitled in English? I haven't been able to find a copy to rent, and the only online sellers I've found have either been German copies (unsubtitled and PAL/Region 2) or from the UK (PAL). If anyone knows where I can find me a North American-ized Lili Marleen, I'd really appreciate it.

- JJJJS

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Poster:handrejka
Date:2003-07-26 21:24
Subject:
Security:Public

Can anyone recommend any books on Fassbinder? I'm interested in his personal life as well as his work.
Thanks

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Poster:jackwad
Date:2003-03-25 13:03
Subject:
Security:Public

Check this shit out, Fassbinder is in the Oracle of Bacon:

Rainer Werner Fassbinder was in Lili Marleen (1981) with Giancarlo Giannini
Giancarlo Giannini was in Joshua (2002/I) with Colleen Camp
Colleen Camp was in Trapped (2002) with Kevin Bacon

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Poster:jackwad
Date:2003-03-14 00:03
Subject:
Security:Public

The DVD version of the Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant includes A Little Chaos, R.W.'s second short film, which is possibly the most perfect 10 minutes of film I've ever seen. I almost cried when I read that.

And that is why....there is seriously something wrong with me.

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Poster:jackwad
Date:2003-03-13 12:32
Subject:
Security:Public

From the City Paper review of Fox and His Friends: "Without his trademark facial hair, Fassbinder is startlingly vulnerable on screen, his pale, soft and frequently exposed body making him seem like he's all underbelly. (Fassbinder never let himself be so exposed in life, but Fox is like a nightmare version of himself, the specter that drove him in the opposite direction.)"

Wow.

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Poster:jackwad
Date:2003-03-12 19:37
Subject:
Security:Public

I very much enjoy the Philly Weekly's descriptions of the movies in the FassbinderFest:Collapse )

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